visionary noun

a person who has clear ideas about what should happen or be done in the future. (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/visionary)

The Council of Canadian Child and Youth Care Associations Visionary Award was created in October 2014 at the annual general meeting. The purpose of the award was to honour and
offer recognition to members of the child and youth care field who have made significant contributions to the growth and evolution of Canadian CYC practice, education and
professional advancement. Recipients of this award would be acknowledged as having clearly expressed and acted on their support to practitioners, literature and professional CYC
organizations in Canada.
All rights reserved Council of Canadian Child and Youth Care Associations/Garth Goodwin 1995-2018
Catherine Hedlin, President, Board of Directors, Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta nominated George
Ghitan, CEO of Hull Services for the Visionary Award.
George Ghitan is the epitome of a visionary: an individual who peers into the future, and then, not only has the
ability to see what is possible, but actualizes it.

The Executive Director of Hull Services since 1996, George’s tenure with this Calgary-based organization spans
more than 40 years serving in such critical roles as the Clinical Director of Residential Treatment Programs,
Associate Executive Director, and Managing Director of all programs and services.    

A registered psychologist in Alberta since 1975 he has been actively involved in local and provincial initiatives
relating to children, family and social issues.  He has served as chair or president for numerous associations and
committees outside of Hull Services pertaining to these initiatives.

As Executive Director he’s presided over the expansion of Hull Services from being primarily a residential
treatment facility for troubled youth to incorporate prevention and early intervention programs in the community for
children, young adults and families.  George leads a staff contingent of more than 450, reaching 3,500 children
(and their families) on an annual basis through 27 effective behavioural and mental health programs and services.

George committed to the professionalization of child and youth care in Alberta in many ways. Hull was one of the
first agencies to require Certification as a Child and Youth Care Counsellor for staff. To this day, Hull Services
has the largest number of certified CYC’s in the province of Alberta with supports in place to assist workers to
become certified. Additionally, George backs the Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta through the
generous provision of board and committee members and personally participated in a video on what is child and
youth care. This can be viewed at
http://www.cycaa.com/  

As part of Hull’s growth, George directed the implementation of 10 evidence-based intervention models.  Hull
Services is Canada’s flagship site for the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) founded by Dr. Bruce
Perry of the ChildTrauma Academy in Houston, Texas. Hull Services has trained thousands of clinicians,
educators and caregivers in the core concepts of this approach in order to improve the care of children struggling
with mental health challenges across the province of Alberta, Ontario and Montana.   
George was also responsible for developing an innovative software program for information management, case
management and outcome monitoring that was licensed more than 600 times by individuals and agencies
throughout North America and Australia.  

Today, because of George Ghitan’s guidance and vision, Hull Services is a leader in children’s mental health
inspiring others to join its vision where children are free from behavioural and mental health challenges that
impact them, their families, and society.

George’s commitment to Hull and his life’s work in mental health has always been motivated by his unwavering
belief that we as a collective must take action to improve the lives of all children.    

To quote George,
“Child maltreatment is the base for much of human suffering and for much of
society’s ills. It can be eradicated.”